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Bookmarked: Stories That Move You Young athletes and dancers will relish these tales

These fun titles about all kinds of movement will put a spring in your young reader’s step.

stories that move youBoard/Toddler

‘Heads, Shoulders, Knees and Toes …’ by Annie Kubler
Use a familiar song to get active with your littlest one. When you read the book with your child, help them identify the parts of their body from the book. Then act out the song with them. This will help them learn new words and understand the importance of moving.

‘Babies Around the World: Dancing’ by Tamara Barker
This book is a great way for your young child to see children from different cultures around the world and how they stay active by dancing. Travel through India, China and Ireland, among other countries, to learn how they dance, what they wear and how to say hello in their languages.

Picture Books

stories that move you‘Max Attacks’ by Kathi Appelt
This book is all about a super feisty feline named Max who loves to attack everything that catches his eyes—socks, strings, whatever he can get his paws on. But he especially wants to catch that fish. The story is told in a catchy rhyme that will delight young readers. The illustrations are adorable and capture Max’s energy and sass.

‘How Do You Dance?’ by Thyra Heder
Celebrate and explore the many unique ways people express themselves through movement. Whether the characters in this book are dancing because they’re happy, sad, excited or just because they need to get up and move, this book will inspires readers to dance however they know how.

stories that move youYoung Readers

‘Weird But True Sports’ by National Geographic Kids
What country’s national sport is kite flying? What kind of material is used to make a hockey stick? How many minutes of actual game time are in a baseball game? Find out these zany facts and more in this National Geographic book. This is a good find for reluctant readers or kids who just love wacky facts.

‘Her Fearless Run’ by Kim Chaffee
This beautiful biographical story tells of Kathryn Switzer, the first woman to run the Boston Marathon with official race numbers in 1967. Readers will discover Kathryn’s grit and determination that led her to achieve this feat. Equally interesting are the stunning illustrations tell the story. A great book for any adult or child interested in running or sports of any kind. It is an inspiring read.

Middle Readers

stories that move you‘The Crossover’ by Kwame Alexander and illustrated by Dawud Anyabwile
Kwame Alexander’s Newbery Award-winning novel gets new life in this graphic novel adaptation. Josh Bell loves basketball, just like his twin brother and his dad. He’s great at it, too. But as his brother stops spending much time with him and their dad’s health wanes, Josh makes a poor choice and his life begins to turn upside down. Even if your child has read the original, this graphic novel adaptation of Alexander’s novel is engaging.

‘This Was Our Pact’ by Ryan Andrews
Each year on the autumn equinox, their village sends lighted lanterns down a river, and this group of boys has made a pact to follow the lanterns by bike to wherever they go. As the night gets darker and the road more treacherous, the boys begin to head home, until only two are left on this magical quest full of talking bears, magic potions, monsters and courage. This book will inspire kids to get up, get active and go out on an adventure of their own.

stories that move youYoung Adults

‘Check Please!’ by Ngozi Ukazu
This is a collection of webcomics about Bitty, a graceful junior figure skater and amateur baker who finds himself out of his depth when he joins the rough-and-tumble world of college hockey. The art is adorable and comes in easy-to-digest chapters that makes it a breezy read.

‘I Hope You Get This Message’ by Farah Naz Rishi
What would you do if you found out the world was about to be annihilated in seven days? As Earth is translating messages of eminent destruction, three teens try to make amends with those they have hurt and those they have lost in this page-turning blend of science fiction and drama.

Conni L. Strittmatter is the Youth & Family Engagement Manager, Baltimore County Public Library.

About Conni L. Strittmatter

Baltimore's Child is written by parents like you. Want to contribute? Email our editor Jessica Gregg at jgregg@midatlanticmedia.com.

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